2017 Meeting and Hotel Registration are now open!

The 2017 SECSOR Annual Meeting will be held March 3-5 at the Raleigh Marriott Crabtree Valley in Raleigh, North Carolina. Click here to register for the meeting.

Rooms at the Marriott are available to attendees at a special rate of $119.00 per night. Reservations must be made no later than February 3, 2017, to receive this special discounted rate. To make your hotel reservation, click on this link. If you prefer to call in your reservation, call 1-888-236-2427 and tell the agent you want to book into the room block for Market Code: SCR.

2017 Call for Papers Available

The Call for Papers for our 2017 Annual Meeting, to be held March 3-5 at the Marriott Raleigh Crabtree Valley in Raleigh, N.C., is posted below and attached as a Word document and as an Adobe Acrobat file. The theme of this year’s meeting is “Utopia and Dystopia.”
PLEASE NOTE: Proposals this year are to be submitted through the Google Docs link available here or at the “Proposal Submission Form” tab at the top of the SECSOR home page.
IF you are submitting in any of these sections:
• Ethics, Religion, and Society
• Judaism
• Religion, Culture, and the Arts
• Religions in America
• Religions of Asia
• Hebrew Bible/Old Testament
The chairs of these sections have requested that proposals ALSO be e-mailed to chairs, as indicated in each section’s call. If you are e-mailing your proposal to a chair, please submit it through Google Docs as well.

When you submit a proposal via e-mail, please be sure that the subject line is clear. Suggested format is: SECSOR Proposal / Section Name / Your Name
Although presenters in other sections do not need to send proposals to the section chairs, chairs’ contact information is provided in the Call for Papers as a courtesy for those who may have questions or concerns regarding their proposals.

Call for Papers — Word Document

Call for Papers — Adobe Acrobat File (PDF)

2017 Call for Papers

2017 Call for Papers

AAR: Bible and Modern Culture

The Bible and Modern Culture group invites proposals on any topic related to Bible and contemporary issues of interpretation and hermeneutics.  In addition, together with the Constructive Theologies section, we would like to invite papers on “Theological Visions of Hope amidst Modern Dystopias.” Submit proposals through the Google Docs paper submission form.

AAR: Black Cultures and the Study of Religion

The Black Cultures and the Study of Religion Group seeks papers that address “Black Religion and the Politics of Representation.” This call seeks papers that interrogate the various ways that black religion shapes and is shaped by the representational politics that attend to black cultural productions and public discourses involving “blackness.” Historically, the cultural politics that have shaped the representation of blackness have been rooted in a desire for the re-humanization of black bodies in the public imagination. Against racist portrayals of dark-skinned others, black religious agents have participated in resisting such “negative” representations with “positive” ones.  Yet, what is the relationship between “religion” and the public representation of “blackness” in this historical moment– especially given recent critiques of “respectability politics” and increased attention to the intersectionality of race, class, gender, sexuality, age, etc., and even articulations of “post-blackness”? Papers might address the relationship between black religion and racial representation in the realms of news, film, music, fashion, television, social media, etc. (historical or contemporary). Keeping in mind, however, the double signification of “representation,” attention to the cultural representation of blackness in the public sphere and policy debates is also very much encouraged. In terms of the latter, papers might consider the ways that competing notions of racial representation have contributed to the perceived rift between religious leaders and contemporary forms of activism, such as Black Lives Matters– i.e. who represents “black interests”– religious leaders, politicians, activists, elders, black youth, etc.? Likewise, papers might consider the ways that certain modes of black religious discourse and practice encourage more complex cultural representations and representational politics than others. Submit proposals through the Google Docs paper submission form.

AAR: Constructive Theologies

In keeping with the conference theme “Utopia and Dystopia,” the Constructive Theologies section invites proposals for presentations on the theme of eschatology, broadly construed. Topics for consideration might include the relationship between future-oriented and realized eschatology; visualizations of the Kingdom/Kin-dom of God; eschatology and ecology; eschatology and embodiment; etc. Constructive Theologies also invites proposals for three co-sponsored sessions: (1) “The Reformation, 500 Years Later” with History of Christianity; (2) “Theological Visions of Hope amidst Modern Dystopias” with Bible and Modern Culture; and (3) “Womanist Practical Theology” with Women, Gender and Religion. For the co-sponsored session on Womanist Practical Theology, we especially seek papers that explore how womanist theological approaches interrogate, disrupt, and enrich theological scholarship, pedagogy, or activism. Contact Steven R. Harmon, Gardner-Webb University School of Divinity (sharmon@gardner-webb.edu) and Elizabeth O’Donnell Gandolfo, Wake Forest University School of Divinity (gandoleo@wfu.edu) with any questions. Submit proposals through the Google Docs paper submission form.

AAR: Ethics, Religion, and Society

Themes: Proposals on all topics will be considered, but the following topics are encouraged: (1) ethics, spiritual practice, and wellbeing; (2) ethics, religion, and climate change; (3) sexual ethics, especially LGBT aesthetics and ethics; (4) political ethics with focus on the presidential election. All submissions are encouraged to consider and pay close attention to issues pertaining to the balance between theory and applied ethics.  Submit proposals to Sally Holt, Belmont University (sally.holt@belmont.edu) and Michael Stoltzfus, Georgia Gwinnett College (mstoltzfus@ggc.edu). Please also submit proposals through the Google Docs paper submission form.

AAR: History of Christianity

We invite proposals that relate the history of Christianity to the theme of the 2017 meeting, “Utopia and Dystopia.” Proposals may deal with any period of history and may be conducted from any methodological or theoretical starting point; the theme “Utopia and Dystopia” may be construed broadly. There will be four sessions. (1) Joint session with Constructive Christian Theologies entitled “The Reformation, 500 Years Later.” (2) Session on “Utopia and Dystopia in the History of Christianity.”(3) Open call. Graduate students are encouraged to send proposals, provided that the proposal includes the name and contact information of a faculty member who agrees to mentor the student as needed. Send questions to Thomas J. Whitley, Florida State University (tjw11c@my.fsu.edu) and Andrew Gardner, Florida State University (abg15@my.fsu.edu). Submit proposals through the Google Docs paper submission form.

AAR: Islam

The theme for this year’s meeting is Utopia and Dystopia; all proposals in Islamic studies on this topic are welcome and the following especially invited: (1) “Critical Review of The Study Qur’an;” we invite discussions on: scholarly critiques and reviews; its contribution to the field and its limitations; questions about the ideology and agendas of its compliers; benefits and limitations of its pluralistic approach; linguistic and terminological analysis; comparison to similar works of translation; and its uses in the classroom and academia. (2) The Teaching and Learning Religion section in cooperation with the Islam section seeks papers on the theme of “Teaching Islam Both as Scholars of Islam and Scholars of Other Religious Traditions.” We are looking for papers that address these questions: What are the particular challenges you face as a specialist or a non-specialist in Islam? What unique perspective can you bring to the study of Islam? How do your particular strengths and weaknesses as a specialist or non-specialist shape your teaching practices?

Submit proposals through the Google Docs paper submission form. Question can be directed to Dr. Jodie Lyon (lyon@uga.edu), Dr. Derrick Lemons (dlemons@uga.edu), Dr. Eleanor Finnegan (edfinnegan@ua.edu) or Dr. Roshan Iqbal (roshan.iqbal.05@gmail.com) for the combined session, and to Dr. Eleanor Finnegan (edfinnegan@ua.edu) and Dr. Roshan Iqbal (roshan.iqbal.05@gmail.com) for the Islam session.

AAR: Judaism

Proposals are sought on the following themes: 1) As a joint session between New Testament, Judaism, and ASOR, we invite papers that address issues within these areas that intersect with one another, as reflected in history, texts, archaeology, or historical ethnography in the Second Temple through the Mishnaic periods. Papers focused on utopian and dystopian elements are especially welcome for the joint session. For questions regarding the joint session, contact the New Testament Section Chairs: Kathy Barrett Dawson (kathy@kathybarrettdawson.org) or Mark Proctor (mproctor@leeuniversity.edu) the Judaism Chairs: Sam Kessler (samuel.j.kessler@gmail.com) or Michael Fuller (mfuller@leeuniversity.edu); or the ASOR Chair: Tom McCollough (tom.mccollough@centre.edu). 2) A session on Yaakov Ariel’s An Unusual Relationship: Evangelical Christians and Jews, or on Jewish/Jewish-Christian messianism in the modern period generally. 3) An open call for papers on topics related to Judaism past or present. Submit all paper proposals by email to Michael Fuller, Lee University, MFULLER@LEEUNIVERSITY.EDU, and Samuel Kessler, SAMUEL.J.KESSLER@GMAIL.COM. Please also submit proposals through the Google Docs paper submission form.

AAR: Method and Theory in the Study of Religion

The Method and Theory in Religion Section seeks papers related to the following topics: 1) Method and Theories related to Dystopias and Utopias. What causes people to believe in utopian/dystopian visions? How do people construct visions of the future and to what purpose? Papers should engage a particular theoretical apparatus (psychological, sociological, biological, literary, etc.) in their analysis. 2) The 2016 Election and Religion: An Analysis. How important was religion in the election of 2016? We seek papers that address an analysis of the different candidates’ use or avoidance of religion and what role religion or religious themes played in the election and the electorate. 3) Analyzing Contemporary Evangelicalism. Evangelicalism has been portrayed as on the ropes. Membership is declining, the Donald Trump phenomena seemed to belie the unity of the movement, and millennials are increasingly abandoning Evangelicalism. We seek papers that analyze what is happening in Evangelicalism from a theoretical standpoint. Why and to what degree is Evangelicalism in trouble? What sort of reconfigurations or alternatives will result? Submit proposals through the Google Docs paper submission form.

AAR: Philosophy of Religion

Themes: Proposals on all topics in Philosophy of Religion will be considered, but the following session themes are encouraged: (1) a session on the conference theme of “Utopia/Dystopia;” (2) an open call for presentations in any area of philosophy of religion; (3) a possible joint session with Method and Theory on Kevin Schilbrack’s Philosophy and the Study of Religion: A Manifesto, consisting of an author-meets-respondents conversation.* For all sessions, please direct questions to Nathan Eric Dickman (Young Harris College) at nedickman@yhc.edu or Stephen Dawson (Lynchburg College) at dawson.s@lynchburg.edu. *For the joint session on Schilbrack’s book, questions may also go to Laura Ammon (AmmonLL@appstate.edu) or Randall W. Reed (reedrw@appstate.edu). Submit proposals through the Google Docs paper submission form.

AAR: Religion and Ecology

Themes: All proposals that deal with the interface of religion and ecology/nature will considered but those addressing the 2017 theme of “Dystopia/Utopia” are encouraged: (1) explorations of Utopian and Dystopian themes in ecological discourse, aesthetics and practice; (2)  as our meeting location, Raleigh, NC, is located at the heart of the Food and Faith movement, we invite papers on the subject of Eating and the Intersections of Faith, Nature, Work and Community; (3) Ecological Martyrs (in honor of Berta Caceres, assassinated in Honduras in 2016); (4) Thinking about the End: Religion and Extinction. Send questions to Jefferson Calico, University of the Cumberlands (jefferson.calico@ucumberlands.edu). Submit proposals through the Google Docs paper submission form.

AAR: Religion, Culture, and the Arts

Themes: All papers related to Religion, Culture, and the Arts will be considered. Special consideration will be given to papers or panels related to the following themes: (1) Papers dealing with the meeting’s 2017 theme “Utopia and Dystopia” in science fiction books, films, and other media; (2) Religion and Young Adult and/or Children’s Literature; (3) Religion and Games/Gaming; (4) Open call. Please submit proposals to co-chair Meredith Ross (mr09@my.fsu.edu). (5) Co-sponsored with the Religions in America section, we issue a joint call for papers for an “author meets critic” roundtable on Dr. Jason Bivins’s Spirits Rejoice! Jazz and American Religion (Oxford, 2015). Proposals to this joint session should be submitted with copies to both Sections. Email proposals to this joint session to Meredith Ross (mr09@my.fsu.edu) with copy to Dr. Monica Reed (mcreed@lsu.edu) and Andy McKee (am13ag@my.fsu.edu). Please also submit proposals through the Google Docs paper submission form.

AAR: Religions in America

Themes: Papers in all areas of Religions in America will be considered, but special consideration will be given to the following themes: (1) Religion, Immigration, and Borders; (2) Religion in Politics; (3) Papers dealing specifically with the meeting’s 2017 theme “Utopia and Dystopia” in the Americas; and (4) Open Session: papers are invited on topics related to religion in an American context. Email proposals to the Religions in America Section to Dr. Monica Reed (monicaCreed@gmail.com) and Andy McKee (am13ag@my.fsu.edu). (5) Co-sponsored with the Religion, Culture, and the Arts section, we issue a joint call for papers for an “author meets critic” roundtable on Dr. Jason Bivins’s Spirits Rejoice! Jazz and American Religion (Oxford, 2015). Proposals to this joint session should be submitted with copies to both sections. Email proposals to this joint session to Dr. Monica Reed (monicaCreed@gmail.com) and Andy McKee (am13ag@my.fsu.edu) with copy to Meredith Ross (mr09@my.fsu.edu). Please also submit proposals through the Google Docs paper submission form.

 

AAR: Religions of Asia

Themes: (1) In conjunction with the 2017 theme “Utopia/Dystopia” we solicit proposals on the topic of utopia and dystopia in Asian religious texts, traditions, practices, rituals, and religious communities. (2) A joint session with Women, Gender and Religion on women and gender in Asian religions.* (3) Open call – we encourage proposals from any subject within Religions of Asia. For all sessions, please send proposals to Lisa Battaglia, Samford University (lbattagl@samford.edu) and Rachel Pang, Davidson College (rhpang@davidson.edu). Please also submit proposals through the Google Docs paper submission form. *For questions regarding the joint session with Women, Gender and Religion, please contact Laine Walters Young (laine.c.walters.young@vanderbilt.edu), Vicki Phillips (phillips_v@wvwc.edu) or Zannah Kimbrel (skimbrel@uncc.edu).

AAR: Secularism, Religious Freedom, and Global Politics

Proposals from any disciplinary or methodological perspective on topics related to secularism, religious freedom, and global politics are welcome. We are especially interested in proposals related to (1) the roles of religious freedom in international relations and foreign policy; (2) critical accounts of “freedom” or “religious” in the production of “religious freedom;” (3) conceptualizations and consequences of the public and private; (4) discourses of religious freedom in historical or contemporary debates about refugees. Submit proposals through the Google Docs paper submission form.

 

AAR: Teaching and Learning Religion

The Teaching and Learning Religion section critically examines pedagogical theory and practice. For the 2017 meeting, we invite paper proposals related to the following three themes: 1) For a session on “Teaching Struggling Students,” we invite papers that address the question: “What are the best practices for helping and empowering students who have a difficult time adjusting to higher education for social, cultural, economic, religious, academic, or other reasons?” Proposals should be submitted through the web link provided. If you have questions please contact Dr. Jodie Lyon (lyon@uga.edu) or Dr. Derrick Lemons (dlemons@uga.edu).  Chair: Dr. Derrick Lemons. 2) For a joint session with the Islam section, we seek paper proposals on the theme of “Teaching Islam both as Scholars of Islam and Scholars of Other Religious Traditions.” In this session, paper should explore the following questions: What are the particular challenges you face as a specialist or a non-specialist in Islam? What unique perspective can you bring to the study of Islam? How do your particular strengths and weaknesses as a specialist or non-specialist shape your teaching practices? Proposals should be submitted through the web link provided. Questions can be directed to Dr. Jodie Lyon (lyon@uga.edu), Dr. Derrick Lemons (dlemons@uga.edu), Dr. Eleanor Finnegan (edfinnegan@ua.edu), or Dr. Roshan Iqbal (roshan.iqbal.05@gmail.com). 3) For a third session, we offer an open call for papers. The Teaching and Learning Religion section invites proposals that join innovative teaching practice with the scholarship of teaching and learning. Demonstrations of new or original teaching strategies are welcomed as a part of presentations. Submit proposals through the Google Docs paper submission form. Please direct questions to either Dr. Jodie Lyon (lyon@uga.edu) or Dr. Derrick Lemons (dlemons@uga.edu). Chair: Dr. Jodie Lyon.

AAR: Women, Gender, and Religion

Women, Gender and Religion seeks proposals for a session that constructively engage with relationality: new takes on intimate relationships, relational forms (particularly new, or evolving ones like polyamory, same-sex marriage, cohabitation as mainstream, self-love, etc.), law and religion’s joint influence on relationships, ecclesiastical relationality; and relationships in ministry. For questions, contact the co-chairs, Vicki Phillips, phillips_v@wvwc.edu, and Laine C. Walters-Young, laine.c.walters.young@vanderbilt.edu. For all sessions, submit proposals through the Google Docs paper submission form.

Joint session: The Women, Gender, and Religion group, in collaboration with the Constructive Theologies group, welcomes papers on the broad theme of womanist practical theology. We especially seek papers that explore how womanist theological approaches interrogate, disrupt, and enrich theological scholarship, pedagogy, or activism. Direct questions for this joint session to WGR co-chairs Vicki Phillips, phillips_v@wvwc.edu, and Laine C. Walters-Young, laine.c.walters.young@vanderbilt.edu, or to the co-chairs for the Constructive Theologies group, Elizabeth Gandolfo, gandolfo@wfu.edu and  Steve Harmon, sharmon@gardner-webb.edu.

Joint Session: Women, Gender, and Religion and Asian Religions invite proposals on women and gender in Asian religions. Direct questions for this joint session to WGR co-chairs Vicki Phillips, phillips_v@wvwc.edu, and Laine C. Walters-Young, laine.c.walters.young@vanderbilt.edu, or to the co-chairs for Asian Religions, Rachel H. Pang, rhpang@davidson.edu, and Lisa J. Battaglia, lbattagl@samford.edu.

ASOR: Archaeology and the Ancient World

1)         Open session – We encourage submissions that report on ongoing excavations, on archaeological theory and/or method, and other topics relating to material culture and archaeology.

2)         Joint Session with SBL/New Testament and AAR/Judaism on utopia and dystopia in literature and material culture. As a joint session with New Testament, Judaism, and ASOR, we invite papers that address issues within these areas that intersect with one another, as reflected in history, texts, archaeology, or historical ethnography in the Second Temple through the Mishnaic periods. Papers focused on utopian and dystopian elements are especially welcome for the joint session. For questions regarding the joint session, contact the New Testament Section Chairs: Kathy Barrett Dawson (kathy@kathybarrettdawson.org) or Mark Proctor (mproctor@leeuniversity.edu ); the Judaism Chairs: Sam Kessler (samuel.j.kessler@gmail.com) or Michael Fuller (mfuller@leeuniversity.edu); or the ASOR Chair: Tom McCollough (tom.mccollough@centre.edu).

3)         Teaching in the Field: Best Practices in Field Schools – We are interested in papers from those who both lead and have been participants in archaeological field schools.

For all sessions, submit proposals through the Google Docs paper submission form.

 

 

SECSOR: Undergraduate Research

Students at institutions in the Southeast Region are invited to submit papers for the Undergraduate Sessions, sponsored by SECSOR. Open to all topics, the sessions will be composed of the papers considered the best submissions by an interdisciplinary committee. Students should submit completed papers that reflect original student research of an appropriate length for presentation (approximately 12 double-spaced pages). No paper over 15 double-spaced pages, regular size font, will be considered; one submission per student. On a cover page, please include contact information for the student and a faculty sponsor who has reviewed the submission. Proposals are to be submitted through the Google Docs link no later than December 15, 2016. The link is available at the “Proposal Submission Form” tab at the top of the SECSOR home page. Questions may be directed to the program chairs: for AAR, Dr. Diana Walsh Pasulka (pasulkad@uncw.edu); for SBL, Dr. Doug Hume (doug.hume@pfeiffer.edu). Note: Undergraduates may submit proposals to other sections as well.

All undergraduate papers are automatically considered for the Undergraduate Paper Prize.

 

SBL: Hebrew Bible/Old Testament

The Old Testament / Hebrew Bible section invites proposals for two open sessions (one on Friday evening, and one on Saturday morning), particularly regarding this year’s theme.  In addition, we request proposals related to the reception history of biblical texts to be presented at the third session (on Saturday afternoon).  Send your submissions to the section co-chairs, Jim West (jwest@highland.net) and David Schreiner (dbschreiner@gmail.com). Please also submit proposals through the Google Docs paper submission form.

We would also be grateful to anyone who would like to volunteer to chair a session.  Email the co-chairs if you are interested in doing so.

SBL: New Testament

The New Testament section for the 2017 SECSOR conference invites paper proposals for the following sessions: (1) Papers engaging narrative strategies in the New Testament writings; (2) Papers that deal with reactions to persecution as demonstrated in the texts of the New Testament; (3) An open call for papers in any area of New Testament studies; and (4) A joint session between New Testament, Judaism, and ASOR inviting papers that address issues within these areas that intersect with one another, as reflected in history, texts, archaeology, or historical ethnography in the Second Temple and Mishnaic periods. In keeping with the conference theme, Utopia and Dystopia, papers focused on utopian and dystopian elements are especially welcome for the joint session. For questions regarding the New Testament sessions, contact the New Testament Section Chairs: Kathy Barrett Dawson (kathy@kathybarrettdawson.org) or Mark Proctor (mproctor@leeuniversity.edu). For questions regarding the joint session, contact the New Testament Section Chairs; the Judaism Chairs: Sam Kessler (samuel.j.kessler@gmail.com) or Michael Fuller (mfuller@leeuniversity.edu); or the ASOR Chair: Tom McCollough (tom.mccollough@centre.edu). Submit proposals through the Google Docs paper submission form.

 

Support

SECSOR is glad to acknowledge the support of the American Academy of Religion and the Society of Biblical Literature. In addition, these institutions currently support the work of SECSOR:

Berea College    •    Campbell University    •    Candler School of Theology

Duke Divinity School   •   Lee University    •    Lenoir-Rhyne University

Louisiana State University    •    Millsaps College    •    Pfeiffer University

Presbyterian College    •    Transylvania University    •    University of Alabama

University of North Carolina at Asheville    •    University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Virginia Tech    •    West Virginia Wesleyan College    •    Wingate University

Winthrop University

Our institutional supporters renew their commitment annually, and we welcome new institutional supporters throughout the year. If your institution would like to support the work of SECSOR, please follow the links below:

SECSOR institutional contribution form

W9 SECSOR (if your institution requires it)

2016 Annual Meeting Summary

We were so glad to have 245 of you at the 2016 SECSOR Annual Meeting, held March 4-6 in Atlanta, Georgia, at the Marriott Perimeter Center.
Our 20 sections convened a total of 50 sessions.
The theme for the meeting was “Interpretation in Context.” Thank you to our plenary speaker, Dr. Timothy K. Beal, from Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio. His address was titled “Thief in the Night of the Living Dead: Revelation, Apocalypticism, and the Emergence of Evangelical Horror Culture.”
We also heard presentations from the regional presidents of AAR and SBL. The SBL regional president, Dr. Margaret Aymer of Austin Presbyterian Theological Seminary, delivered an address titled “Outrageous, Audacious, Courageous, Willful: Reading the Enslaved Girl of Acts 12.” The AAR regional president, Dr. Anne Blue Wills of Davidson College, presented “Unofficially Official: Telling Clergy-Wives’ Stories – the Case of Ruth Bell Graham.”
The AAR graduate student award was won by Won Chul Shin of Emory University. His paper was “Sing Broken Hallelujah: A Critical Analysis on Incarcerated Women’s Moral Injury and the Role of the Religious Practice of Singing in the Healing of Moral Injury.” The SBL graduate student award was won by Carson Bay of Florida State University for the paper “Austin on Paul: Reading ἀνάθεμα ἔστω in Galatians 1:8–9 with Speech-Act Theory.” The undergraduate prize was won by Elizabeth Hardt of Transylvania University. Her paper was “‘ISIS Brides’: Western Neo-Orientalist Narratives of Female Terrorism.”
The 2017 Annual Meeting will be held on March 3-5 at the Raleigh Marriott Crabtree Valley Hotel, 4500 Marriott Drive, Raleigh, NC, 27612. The theme will be “Utopia/Dystopia.”

Sections:
AAR Black Cultures in the Study of Religion
AAR Constructive Theologies
AAR Ethics, Religion & Society
AAR History of Christianity
AAR Islam
AAR Judaism
AAR Method & Theory in the Study of Religion
AAR Philosophy of Religion
AAR Religion & Ecology
AAR Religion & Law
AAR Religion, Culture & the Arts
AAR Religions in America
AAR Religions of Asia
AAR Teaching & Learning Religion
AAR Women, Gender & Religion
ASOR Archeology & the Ancient World
SECSOR Undergraduate Research
SBL Bible & Modern Culture
SBL Hebrew Bible/Old Testament
SBL New Testament

March 2016 SECSOR Meeting

Registration is now open for the 2016 Annual Meeting, from Friday, March 4 through Sunday, March 6. Please follow this link to register before the deadline of Sunday, February 21. All participants and attendees at the meeting need to register. Preregistration rates are $60 for SECSOR members (members of AAR, SBL, and/or ASOR) and $30 for student members. The visitors/non-members registration fee is $70. Preregistration is encouraged; onsite registration is by CASH OR CHECK only, and the fees are $70 for members or visitors, and $35 for students or spouses/partners.

The Women’s Caucus Breakfast (Saturday morning) and the Underrepresented Minorities Luncheon (Saturday noon) are offered FREE of charge; if you qualify, please preregister and indicate your intention to attend!

The meeting will be held at the Atlanta Marriott Perimeter Center, 246 Perimeter Center Parkway NE, Atlanta, GA, 30346. The standard room rate is $99.00 per night, plus applicable taxes (12%). You will need to mention the Southeastern Commission for the Study of Religion to get this special rate. Please make your reservations as soon as possible, but no later than Friday, February 12, directly with Marriott reservations at 1 (800) 228-9290 or (770) 394-6500.

Help is needed staffing the registration table during the SECSOR meeting. If you are a student planning to attend the meeting and would like to receive a waiver of the registration fee in exchange for work at the registration table, contact the Executive Director, Sandra Hack Polaski, at ED@secsor.org.

2016 Call for Papers

The deadline for paper proposals for our 2016 meeting in Atlanta, Georgia, is October 5. Students submitting papers to the undergraduate research section have until December 15. Please remember that these papers need to be reviewed by a faculty sponsor before submission. Send in those proposals!

Call for Papers 2016

Call for Papers 2016

Call for Papers 2016
SECSOR 2016

Come and join us in Atlanta, GA for the Southeastern Commission for the Study of Religion (SECSOR) Regional meeting on March 4–6, 2016!

The following sections and program units invite members/participants who wish to present a paper or coordinate a session to submit the Proposal Submission Form available on the SECSOR website (http://secsor.org) along with proposals to the appropriate section chairs by October 5, 2015. Proposals should consist of a 1-2 page description of the presentation unless otherwise requested in the call for a particular section.

Each member/participant is limited to ONE (1) proposal, although a member may submit the same proposal to multiple sections. If a member submits a proposal to multiple sections, the relevant sections must be ranked as first or second choice on the Proposal Submission Form. Proposals for joint sessions as listed in the call should be sent to all involved section chairs, as directed, but do not have to be ranked.

Please note that, unless otherwise indicated, papers must be of such a length as can be presented within twenty (20) minutes, typically. Planned use of audio-visual equipment must be noted on the submission form. SECSOR will provide only a limited number of AV rooms with screen, cart, and power cords. Presenters must bring their own projection, audio, and other support equipment. It is imperative that we have all information concerning AV equipment on the proposal forms in order to insure presentations have the support needed. It is not possible to accommodate AV needs once meeting room assignments have been determined.

The copying of handouts is the responsibility of the presenter. All program participants must be registered for the meetings.

Paper Prizes and the SBL Regional Scholar Award

Members/participants are reminded that four paper prizes are awarded at every meeting of SECSOR. Prizes are given by SECSOR to the best undergraduate paper submitted; and by each of the three societies (AAR, SBL, ASOR) for the best graduate paper submitted.

All undergraduate papers, which must be received no later than December 15, 2015, are automatically considered for the Undergraduate Paper Prize.

Graduate students who wish to be considered for the AAR or SBL Graduate Student Prize must notify the chair of the section that has accepted their paper, and submit to that chair a paper of no longer than 12 pages no later than January 15, 2016.

Graduate students who wish to be considered for the Joseph A. Callaway award from ASOR must submit to the ASOR chair a paper of no longer than 12 pages by January 15, 2016.

SBL members presenting to one of the SBL sections who have defended their dissertation between March 2012 and March 2016 are encouraged to apply to be considered for the SBL Regional Scholar Award. For more information on the requirements for consideration, please contact Dr. Annie Tinsley: (annietinsley14@gmail.com).

(ASOR) Archaeology and the Ancient World

Themes: (1) Presidential Address; (2) Current Excavations: Reports from the Field; (3) Text and Artifact: Integrating Literary Sources and Material Culture; (4) Open Session: papers are invited on topics related to archaeology and religion. Please send your proposal or complete paper (required of first-time presenters) to Byron R. McCane (mccanebr@wofford.edu). Student papers will be considered for the Joseph A. Callaway Award.

(AAR) Bible and Modern Culture 

Themes: (1)  Open call for papers broadly relating to the Bible and Modern Culture. (2) “Ritual/Cultural Practices:  Holy Texts, Holy Actions, Holy Lives.”  We welcome proposals on this broad theme of interaction with the Holy, including those dealing literature, literary or historical analysis, biography, current or historical aspects of culture, anthropology or sociology, etc. Send proposals for the above two sessions to Professor Brian Mooney (brian.mooney@jwu.edu) or Dr. Finbar Benjamin (fbenjamin@oakwood.edu) (3).  Co-sponsored session with New Testament and Method and Theory in the Study of Religion. We seek papers on the following: Biblical Studies has often been on the forefront of using new methods and theoretical designs to read ancient texts. We seek papers that analyze the current state of interpretation and hermeneutics, with an emphasis on the theory, application, and critique of new methods. Send proposals for this session to Dr. Randall Reed (reedrw@appstate.edu).

(AAR) Black Cultures and the Study of Religion Call for Papers

Themes: (1) The Black Cultures and the Study of Religion Group welcomes papers that deal with the relationship between hip hop and religion, especially in the context of Southern-based hip hop, Atlanta hip hop culture, and so forth. We seek papers that address the connections between black religiosity and hip-hop culture in response to ongoing accusations of hip hop as nihilistic. (2) Joint session. The Black Cultures and the Study of Religion, in collaboration with the Women, Gender, and Religion Group, welcome papers that address and interrogate the performance of race and gender in contemporary popular media. We seek papers that examine this intersection in film, music, television series, and so forth. We especially invite papers that deal with the depictions of race and gender in the work of Shonda Rhimes, creator of ABC’s Scandal. Send paper proposals to Joseph Winters (jwinter6@uncc.edu) and Richard Coble (richard.r.coble@vanderbilt.edu) Send questions and proposals to Joseph Winters, UNC Charlotte (jwinter6@uncc.edu) and Jamil Drake, Emory University (jamil.drake@emory.edu)

(AAR) Constructive Theologies

Themes: (1) joint session with Philosophy of Religion and Religions of Asia on “apophasis within or across religions”; (2) joint session with Religion and Ecology on the ecohermeneutics of Pope Francis’ environmental encyclical scheduled for release this year; (3) open call for papers relating theologies of social location to the 2016 SECSOR theme “Translation and Context”. Submit all proposals to Steven R. Harmon, Gardner-Webb University School of Divinity, (sharmon@gardner-webb.edu) and Elizabeth O’Donnell Gandolfo, Wake Forest University (elizabeth.gandolfo@gmail.com). *For the joint session on apophasis within or across religions, please include also Lisa Battaglia lbattagl@samford.edu), Rachel Pang (rhpang@davidson.edu), and Nathan Eric Dickman (nedickman@yhc.edu); for the joint session on the ecohermeneutics of Pope Francis’ environmental encyclical, please include also Todd LeVasseur (levasseurtj@cofc.edu) and Jefferson Calico (jcalico70@gmail.com).

(AAR) Ethics, Religion, and Society

Themes: Proposals on all topics will be considered, but the following topics are encouraged: (1) a joint session with Islam and with Religions of Asia on immigration and religion; (2) ethics and interreligious dialogue in America; (3) violence and non-violence in cultural context; (4) world religions, disability studies and health. All submissions are encouraged to consider and pay close attention to issues pertaining to the balance between theory and applied ethics.  Submit proposals to Sally Holt, Belmont University (sally.holt@belmont.edu) and Michael Stoltzfus, Valdosta State University (mjstoltz@valdosta.edu). In addition, for the joint session with Islam and with Religions of Asia and Ethics, Religion and Society also send proposals to Eleanor Finnegan (finneged@gmail.com), Lisa Battaglia (lbattagl@samford.edu) and Rachel Pang (rhpang@davidson.edu).

(SBL) Hebrew Bible/Old Testament

Themes: (1) The Hebrew Bible/Old Testament section invites proposals for two open sessions, particularly regarding this year’s theme of “translation and contexts.” (2) In addition, we request proposals related to the reception history of biblical texts. We are especially interested in papers exploring how biblical texts have been received in fiction, art, music, and film. How does the translation of biblical texts into these new contexts produce new meaning? (3) A final session will focus on commentary writing and include an invited panel discussion with Carol Newsom and Choon-Leong Seow regarding the future of the commentary. Send proposals for open sessions to co-chairs: Phillip Michael Sherman (Phillip.Sherman@maryvillecollege.edu) and Jim West (jwest@highland.net).

(AAR) History of Christianity

Themes: We invite proposals that relate the history of Christianity to the theme of the 2016 meeting, “Translation and Contexts.” Proposals may deal with any period of history and may be conducted from any methodological or theoretical starting point; the theme “Translation and Contexts” may be construed broadly. There will be four sessions. (1) Joint session with Religion and Law entitled, “Conflict and Consensus: Christianity, Civil Rights, and Religious Freedom in the United States.” (2) Joint session with Philosophy of Religion and Method and Theory on “Gadamer and Ricoeur: Thinking Through Translation and Interpretive Contexts.”* (3) Session on “Translation and Contexts in the History of Christianity.” (4) Open call. Undergraduate and graduate students are encouraged to send proposals, provided that the proposal includes the name and contact information of a faculty member who agrees to mentor the student as needed. Send questions and proposals to Thomas J. Whitley, Florida State University (twhitley@fsu.edu). *For the joint session on Gadamer and Ricoeur, please send proposals to Nathan Eric Dickman, Young Harris College (nedickman@yhc.edu).

(AAR) Islam

Themes: Proposals on all topics in Islamic Studies are welcome, but submissions on the theme of  “translation” and the following are especially invited: (1) “Immigration and Religion” as part of a joint panel with Religions of Asia and Religion, Ethics and Society; (2) “Historical Texts/Modern Contexts,” which invites papers which broadly interpret connections or disconnects between scholarship or data from the past and contemporary contexts in scholarship and/or in teaching; (3) “Conversations in Islamic Studies: The Study Qur’an,” which invites discussants for a conversation about the implications and contributions of the The Study Qur’an: A New Translation and Commentary being published by HarperOne.  Submit proposals to Eleanor Finnegan, University of Alabama (edfinnegan@ua.edu) and Roshan Iqbal, Agnes Scott College (roshan.iqbal.05@gmail.com). In addition, for the join session with Religions of Asia and Religion, Ethics and Society also send proposals to Sally Holt, Belmont University (sally.holt@belmont.edu), Michael Stoltzfus, Valdosta State University (mjstoltz@valdosta.edu), Rachel Pang, Davidson College (rhpang@davidson.edu), and Lisa Battaglia, Samford University, (lbattagl@samford.edu).

(AAR) JUDAISM

Proposals addressing any topic in Biblical/Early Judaism, Rabbinic Judaism, or Contemporary Judaism will be considered, but proposals are especially sought on the following themes: 1) Contemporary Judaism—any topic related to Judaism in the present day; 2) Rabbinic Judaism—any topic related to rabbinic themes, texts, or historical periods; and 3) Second Temple Judaism—any topic, but special consideration given to proposals pertaining to writings among the Dead Sea Scrolls. Submit all paper proposals by email to Michael Fuller, Lee University, mfuller@leeuniversity.edu, and Samuel Kessler, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, skessler@unc.edu.

(AAR) Method and Theory in the Study of Religion

Themes: (1) The Culture on the Edge collective has produced a number works in publishing, social media and conferences. The participants including Russell McCutcheon, Craig Martin, Monica Miller, Steven Ramey, Merinda Simmons Leslie Smith and Vaia Touna have created a collective with increasing visibility in the American Religious Studies scene. We seek papers that engage this body of work—which comprises an attempt to extend the application of our fields scholarship to other areas of cultural critique—either through critique, analysis or extension. (2) How has the notion of “spirituality” been shaped in popular and academic literature? This panel seeks papers that investigate explanations of religious or non-religious “spirituality” from a theoretical perspective. We especially encourage papers that examine the development of “spirituality” as a category, and that attend to the theories or methods used in studies of spirituality.” Send papers for these sessions to Dr. Randall Reed (reedrw@appstate.edu) and Dr. Laura Ammon (ammonll@appstate.edu).

(3) Co-sponsored session with New Testament and Bible and Modern Culture. We seek papers on the following: New Testament has often been on the forefront of using new methods and theoretical designs to read ancient texts. We seek papers that analyze the current state of interpretation/hermeneutics, with an emphasis on the theory, application, and critique of new methods. Send proposals for this session to Dr. Randall Reed (reedrw@appstate.edu)

(4) Co-Sponsored Session with History of Christianity and Philosophy of Religion. We seek papers on the following: “Gadamer and Ricoeur: Thinking through Translation and Interpretive Contexts”? Send proposals for this session to Dr. Eric Dickman (nedickman@yhc.edu)

(SBL) New Testament

Themes: The New Testament section for the 2016 SECSOR conference invites paper proposals for the following sessions: (1) In keeping with the theme, Translation and Contexts, papers focusing on the role of context(s) (e.g., gender, race, ethnicity, disability, etc.) in translation, especially as it relates to issues of inclusive language in the New Testament. (2) Papers engaging the theme of Powers and Principalities and/or discussing characterization in the New Testament. (3) An open call for papers in any area of New Testament studies. (4) A joint session with Bible and Modern Culture and Method and Theory in the Study of Religion: Biblical Studies has often been on the forefront of using new methods and theoretical designs to read ancient texts. We seek papers that analyze the current state of interpretation/hermeneutics of the New Testament with an emphasis on the theory, application, and critique of new methods. Send proposals for NT sessions to Annie Tinsley (antinsley@shawu.edu) and Kathy Barrett Dawson (kathy@kathybarrettdawson.org). Proposals for the joint session should also be sent to Randy Reed (reedrw@appstate.edu).

(AAR) Philosophy of Religion

Themes: Proposals on all topics in Philosophy of Religion will be considered, but the following session themes are encouraged: (1) a joint session with Religions of Asia and Constructive Theologies on “apophasis within or across religions;”* (2) a joint session with Methods and Theories and History of Christianity on “Gadamer and Ricoeur: Thinking through Translation and Interpretive Contexts;”** (3) an open call for presentations in any area of philosophy of religion, but submissions are particularly encouraged that address the conference theme: “Translation and Context.” For all sessions, please send proposals to Nathan Eric Dickman (Young Harris College) at nedickman@yhc.edu. *For the joint session on apophasis within or across religions, please include Lisa Battaglia (lbattagl@samford.edu), Rachel Pang (rhpang@davidson.edu), Steven Harmon (sharmon@gardner-webb.edu), and Elizabeth O’Donnell Gandolfo (elizabeth.gandolfo@gmail.com). **For the joint session on Gadamer and Ricoeur, please send proposals to Nathan Eric Dickman.

(AAR) Religion and Ecology

Themes: All proposals that deal with the interface of religion and ecology/nature will considered but those addressing the 2016 theme of “Translation and Context” are encouraged: (1) a joint session with Constructive Theologies on the ecohermeneutics of Pope Francis’ environmental encyclical scheduled for release this year; (2) ecocriticism of nature-based narratives in popular texts (movies, books, video games, cartoons); (3) the translation of sustainability into urban contexts via religious environmentalist adaptive lifestyles; (4) Revelation through Art: imagining religion/environment intersections through Performance and Studio Art. Send questions and proposals to Todd LeVasseur, College of Charleston (levasseurtj@cofc.edu), and Jefferson Calico, Eastern Kentucky University (jcalico70@gmail.com). For the joint session between Religion and Ecology and Constructive Theologies also send proposals to Steven Harmon, Gardner-Webb (sharmon@gardner-webb.edu) and Elizabeth Gandolfo, Wake Forest University  (elizabeth.gandolfo@gmail.com)

(AAR) Religion and Law

Theme: Religion and American Law. All proposals related to religion and law will be considered, but we particularly invite papers addressing: (1) The Affordable Care Act (“Obamacare”). (2) Sincerely-held religious belief. (3) Tolerance, pluralism, and the law. (4) Recent Supreme Court decisions such as Burwell v. Hobby Lobby and Holt v. Hobbs. (5) Conflict and Consensus: Christianity, Civil Rights, and Religious Freedom in the United States (joint session with History of Christianity) As evidenced by Indiana’s recent Religious Freedom Restoration Act, the relationship between “religious freedom” and other notions of “human rights” or “civil rights” is far from settled. We invite papers that explore the evolution of religious freedom in Christian history and American history during the last fifty years. Send proposals to Brad Stoddard (bstoddard@mcdaniel.edu) and Mike Graziano (grazmike@gmail.com). If you are proposing a paper or panel for the joint session with History of Christianity, please indicate this in your e-mail.

(AAR) Religion, Culture, and the Arts
Themes: All papers related to Religion, Culture, and the Arts will be considered. Special consideration will be given to papers or panels related to the following themes: (1) Narrative Form and Authenticity in Religion, Culture, and the Arts; (2) The Creation of Transnational Identity in Art, Music, and Culture; (3) Atlanta and Southern Religious Culture and Arts; (4) Open call. Please submit proposals to both section chairs, Cara Burnidge (burnidge@gmail.com) and Andrew McKee (am13ag@my.fsu.edu).

(AAR) Religions in America

Themes: Papers in all areas of Religions in America will be considered, but special consideration will be given to the following themes: (1) Religion, place, and the city; (2) Religion and materialism; (3) Religion, civil rights, civic activism. Email proposals to the Religions in America Section to Dr. Monica Reed (mcreed@lsu.edu) and Joshua Fleer (jfleer@fsu.edu).

(4) With the Teaching and Learning Religion section, we issue a joint call for papers that explore the question “How should instructors approach teaching about controversial religious groups?” Papers that focus on controversial American religious groups will receive special consideration, e.g., the Nation of Islam, the Klan, Westboro Baptist Church, the People’s Temple, etc. Proposals to this joint session should be submitted with copies to both Sections. Email proposals to this joint session to Dr. Monica Reed (mcreed@lsu.edu) and Joshua Fleer (jfleer@fsu.edu) with copy to Drs. Jodie Lyon (lyon@uga.edu) and Derrick Lemons (dlemons@uga.edu).

(AAR) The Religions of Asia

Themes: (1) In conjunction with the 2016 theme, “Translation in Context,” we solicit proposals on the issue of translation broadly conceived: translation, translation studies, the movement across cultures and other boundaries, and so forth; (2) A joint session with Islam & Religion, Ethics, Society on “Religion and Immigration;”* (3) A joint session with Philosophy of Religion & Constructive Theologies on “Apophasis within or across Religions;”** (4) Asian Religion and Popular Culture; (5) Open call. Send questions and proposals to Lisa Battaglia, Samford University (lbattagl@samford.edu) and Rachel Pang, Davidson College (rhpang@davidson.edu). *For the joint session on Religion and Immigration please include Michael Stoltzfus, Valdosta State University (mjstoltz@valdosta.edu), Sally Holt, Belmont University (sally.holt@belmont.edu), and Eleanor Finnegan, The University of Alabama (finneged@gmail.com). **For the joint session on Apophasis within or across Religions, please include Nathan Eric Dickman nedickman@yhc.edu, Steven Harmon (sharmon@gardner-webb.edu), and Elizabeth O’Donnell Gandolfo (elizabeth.gandolfo@gmail.com).

(AAR) Teaching and Learning Religion Themes:

(1) Joint Session. In cooperation with the Religions in America section, we call for papers that explore the question “How should instructors approach teaching about controversial religious groups?” Papers that focus on controversial American religious groups will receive special consideration, e.g., the Nation of Islam, the Klan, Westboro Baptist Church, the People’s Temple, etc. Proposals should be submitted with copies to both Sections. Email proposals to Drs. Jodie Lyon (lyon@uga.edu) and Derrick Lemons (dlemons@uga.edu) with copy to Drs. Joshua Fleer (jfleer@fsu.edu) and Molly Reed (mcreed@lsu.edu);

(2) An invited panel will consider Parker Palmer’s claim that “ultimately we teach who we are.” Panelists will discuss how their own personal religious beliefs factor into their teaching, and the extent to which they reveal their faith perspectives to their students. Special attention will be paid to the ways that pedagogical context (public university, seminary, private faith-affiliated school) determines appropriate ways to incorporate educators’ faith identities into the classroom. Panelists are invited. Chair: Dr. Jodie Lyon;

(3) Open call. The Teaching and Learning Religion section invites proposals (papers or a panel) that join innovative teaching practice with the scholarship of teaching and learning. Proposals should be submitted with copies to both Sections. Email proposals to Drs. Jodie Lyon (lyon@uga.edu) and Derrick Lemons (dlemons@uga.edu). Chair: Dr. Derrick Lemons.

(SECSOR) Undergraduate Research

Students at institutions in the Southeast Region are invited to submit papers for the Undergraduate Sessions, sponsored by SECSOR. Open to all topics, the sessions will be composed of the papers considered the best submissions by an interdisciplinary committee. Students should submit completed papers that reflect original student research of an appropriate length for presentation (approximately 12 double-spaced pages). No paper over 15 double-spaced pages, regular size font, will be considered; one submission per student. On a cover page, please include contact information for the student and a faculty sponsor who has reviewed the submission. Electronic submissions preferred. Send submissions by December 15, 2015, to Lynn R. Huber, Elon University (lhuber@elon.edu). Note: Undergraduates may submit proposals to other sections as well.

(AAR) Women, Gender and Religion

The Women, Gender and Religion Section foregrounds issues of women’s studies, gender, and sexuality, whether in critical analysis of and dialogue with religious traditions or texts; in the promotion of the perspectives, insights, and experiences of marginalized persons; or in the ongoing effort to theorize difference so that lives and systems may be changed. Themes: (1)

Open call for proposals; (2) Proposals that constructively engage the subject of sexual violence (especially on campus) through texts, ethics, theology, history, or other means; and (3) Proposals that consider the intersections of race and masculinity/ies. Email proposals to Vicki Phillips

(phillips_v@wvwc.edu) and Richard Coble (richard.r.coble@vanderbilt.edu). (4) A joint session. With Black Cultures and the Study of Religion, we welcome papers that address and interrogate the performance of race and gender in contemporary popular media. We seek papers that examine this intersection in film, music, television series, and so forth. We especially invite papers that deal with the depictions of race and gender in the recent work of Shonda Rhimes, creator of Scandal. For this co-sponsored session, send paper proposals to Joseph Winters (jwinter6@uncc.edu), Richard Coble (richard.r.coble@vanderbilt.edu), and Vicki Phillips (phillips_v@wvwc.edu).