CFP: Method and Theory in the Study of Religion

Please note: the Call for Papers has been updated with information from the Method and Theory section.

 

AAR: Method and Theory in the Study of Religion

The Method & Theory section invites proposals for two open sessions—submissions must concern either (i) a methodological issue (i.e., problem or proposal) in the history of the field or in current scholarly work in the study of religion or (ii) examine a topic of theoretical interest, whether understanding theory as critique (as in literary theory or critical theory) or an explanatory framework aiming to identify religion’s causes or function. Book review panels (i.e., author meets critics), focusing on current works examining either (i) or (ii) above, are also possible. Questions and submissions can be sent to Russell T. McCutcheon, University of Alabama (russell.mccutcheon@ua.edu).

 

Call for Papers – 2018 Annual Meeting in Atlanta, GA

2018 Call for Papers

All proposal should be submitted through the online submission form.

Deadline for Submissions: October 15th, 2017  

AAR: Bible and Modern Culture

Resisting Culture:  When Christianity and the dominant culture come into conflict.

  • Papers are welcome which deal with ethics, beliefs, social norms (e.g. LGBT issues), science, etc., where culture is wrong or Christianity is wrong. (2) Open call. Papers on any topics related to Bible and modern culture are welcome.

Send questions to Brian Mooney, Brian.Mooney@jwu.edu

AAR: Black Cultures and the Study of Religion Section

In light of this year’s conference theme, “Discerning Truths,” The Black Cultures and the Study of Religion Section seeks papers that address “Black Religion, ‘the Law,” and ‘the truth.’” This call invites submissions that consider the ways in which black religious groups and traditions have come into confrontation with ‘the law,’ state and federal policies, the constitution as an authoritative power and with lawmakers as fair, honest and just administrators. Moreover, the call invites considerations of how black religious groups have discerned, negotiated, and attempted to speak “truths” to power in light of contestations with “the Law.” Submissions are encouraged to draw from historical and contemporary political events that appeal to theological, philosophical, ethical, economic, environmental, racial and gender-related problems, discourse, and claims to truth(s). Submissions might address contemporary phenomena such as various responses of black churches to instances of unregulated police violence, or, the ways the White House’s executive order to ban travel into the United States from seven Muslim countries has impacted black religious cultures. For instance, how has the ban affected African American Muslim communities, and what “truth(s)” have said Muslim communities appealed to and/or articulated in response? (The impact of the ban upon the black community was given some attention when Muhammad, Jr. and Khalilah Ali — son and ex-wife of Muhammad Ali — were detained at a Florida airport). Papers might also take a historical focus and consider Civil Rights legal battles, or, the manners authorities in the New World attempted to criminalize African spiritual practices with decisions like the New Orleans Municipal Council’s order that designated Congo Square in 1817 as the only legal space for African drumming and dancing. Or, from a more diasporic perspective, papers might address instances such as the post-rebellion climate after 1760 in Jamaica when acts were passed against the practice of Obeah rituals, which came to be perceived as a disruptive political force. In either of the cases above, papers might consider how African-derived religious “ways of knowing” or “truth(s)” informed responses to these encounters with “the Law.” Inquiries should be submitted to: timothy.rainey.ii@emory.edu; and  b.mccormack@louisville.edu.

AAR: Constructive Theologies

The Constructive Theologies section invites papers that explore the varieties of theological methods for ‘discerning truth(s).’ Some questions that papers for this session might address include, but are not limited to, the following: How do differing understandings of biblical authority affect the theological discernment? What is the role of tradition and/or ecclesial teaching authority in theological discernment? What is the role of social context and/or personal experience in theological discernment?  What other sources and/or norms play a role in theological discernment of truth(s)?

Constructive Theologies also invites proposals for the following co-sponsored sessions:

  1. A joint session with Philosophy of Religion on J. Aaron Simmons and Bruce Ellis Benson’s The New Phenomenology: A Philosophical Introduction. Simmons will serve on the panel, which will consist of an author-meets-respondents conversation on issues such as the relationship between theology and philosophy of religion, points of overlap, common concerns, and differences between the two disciplines.
  2. A joint session with History of Christianity on the role of discernment in the history of Christian theology and spirituality. Papers addressing contemplative methods (e.g., St. Ignatius of Loyola’s Spiritual Exercises) and/or their relationship to doctrine as seen in any area of Christian History are welcomed.

Questions may be directed to Elizabeth O’Donnell Gandolfo, Wake Forest University School of Divinity (gandoleo@wfu.edu) or Tracey M. Stout, Bluefield College (tstout@bluefield.edu). For the joint session with Philosophy of Religion, questions may also go to Stephen Dawson, Lynchburg College (dawson.s@lynchburg.edu) or Wesley Barker, Mercer Univeristy (barker_wn@mercer.edu).  For the joint session with History of Christianity, questions may also go to Thomas J. Whitley, Florida State University (tjw11c@my.fsu.edu) or Andrew Gardner, Florida State University (abg15@my.fsu.edu).

AAR: Ethics, Religion, and Society

Themes: Proposals on all topics will be considered, but the following topics are encouraged: (1) a joint session with Islam on Ethics, Islam & American Culture; (2) Ethics & Politics in America; (3) Panel for scholars to share current research. All submissions are encouraged to consider and pay close attention to issues pertaining to the balance between theory and applied ethics.  Submit proposals through the Google Docs paper submission form.  Direct any questions to Sally Holt, Belmont University (sally.holt@belmont.edu) and Michael Stoltzfus, Georgia Gwinnett College (mstoltzfus@ggc.edu).   In addition, for the joint session with Islam direct questions to Roshan Iqbal (roshan.iqbal.05@gmail.com).

AAR: History of Christianity

We invite proposals that relate the history of Christianity to the theme of the 2018 meeting, “Discerning Truths.” Proposals may deal with any period of history and may be conducted from any methodological or theoretical starting point; the theme “Discerning Truths” may be construed broadly. There will be three sessions. (1) Joint session with Constructive Christian Theologies on the role of discernment in the history of Christian theology and spirituality. Papers addressing contemplative methods (e.g., St. Ignatius of Loyola’s Spiritual Exercises) and/or their relationship to doctrine as seen in any area of Christian history are welcome. (2) Session on “Discerning Truths in/and the History of Christianity.” (3) Open call. Graduate students are encouraged to send proposals, provided that the proposal includes the name and contact information of a faculty member who agrees to mentor the student as needed. Send questions to Thomas J. Whitley, Florida State University (twhitley@fsu.edu) and Andrew Gardner, Florida State University (abg15@my.fsu.edu). For the joint session, questions may also go to Elizabeth O’Donnell Gandolfo, Wake Forest University School of Divinity (gandoleo@wfu.edu) or Tracey M. Stout, Bluefield College (tstout@bluefield.edu).

AAR: Islam

(1) There will be a joint session with Ethics, Religion, and American Society on Ethics, Islam & American Culture; (2) an open call for all proposals in Islamic studies is welcome. Questions can be directed to Roshan Iqbal (riqbal@agnesscott.edu)

AAR: Judaism

We invite proposals to any one of our four sessions in the following areas: (1) Second Temple Judaism: Open Call; (2) Rabbinic Judaism: Open Call; (3) Contemporary Judaism: Open Call. For these three sessions, we will consider proposals from a wide range of methodological approaches and points of interest but will give preference to essays engaging with the subject anti-Semitism/Judaeophobia. Essays may approach this topic by way of historical case studies, literary criticism, history of schoarlship, comparison, social theory, or any other appropriate avenues. (4) Joint-session: Second Temple Judaism and ASOR. Paper are invited addressing the theme: “The Influence of Romanization on Structures, Thought and Practice in Second Temple Judaism.”

Please direct any questions to Michael Fuller, mfuller@leeuniversity.edu or Giancarlo Angulo, gpa15@my.fsu.edu. Regarding the Joint-Session with ASOR, also include: Greg Linton, GLinton@johnsonu.edu.

AAR: Method and Theory in the Study of Religion

The Method & Theory section invites proposals for two open sessions—submissions must concern either (i) a methodological issue (i.e., problem or proposal) in the history of the field or in current scholarly work in the study of religion or (ii) examine a topic of theoretical interest, whether understanding theory as critique (as in literary theory or critical theory) or an explanatory framework aiming to identify religion’s causes or function. Book review panels (i.e., author meets critics), focusing on current works examining either (i) or (ii) above, are also possible. Questions and submissions can be sent to Russell T. McCutcheon, University of Alabama (russell.mccutcheon@ua.edu).

AAR: Philosophy of Religion

Themes: Proposals on all topics in Philosophy of Religion will be considered, but the following session themes are encouraged: (1) a session on the conference theme of “Discerning Truths”; (2) a session exploring the implications of contemporary theories of the body for philosophy of religion; and (3) a joint session with Constructive Theology on J. Aaron Simmons and Bruce Ellis Benson’s The New Phenomenology: A Philosophical Introduction. Simmons will serve on the panel, which will consist of an author-meets-respondents conversation on issues such as the relationship between theology and philosophy of religion, points of overlap, common concerns, and differences between the two disciplines. For all sessions, please direct questions to Stephen Dawson, Lynchburg College (dawson.s@lynchburg.edu) or Wesley N. Barker, Mercer University (barker_wn@mercer.edu).

For the joint session with Constructive Theologies, questions may also go to Elizabeth O’Donnell Gandolfo, Wake Forest University School of Divinity (gandoleo@wfu.edu) or Tracey M. Stout, Bluefield College (tstout@bluefield.edu).

AAR: Religion and Ecology

The Religion and Ecology section is excited to announce a call for presentations that address the broad theme of “Discerning Truths: from Knowledge to Action in the Age of the Anthropocene.”  All topics will be considered but those which address the following subjects will be given priority:

  • Discerning Truths about Climate Change: Alternative Facts and Religious Knowledge;
  • From Marginalization to Resistance: Blessed are the Ecojustice Activists;
  • Belief, Truth and Action: Religion and the Formation of Eco-praxis;
  • A joint session with Asian Religions on the Theory and Practice of Environmental Activism. We welcome papers addressing Asian religions and the environmental crisis.​ ​Topics may include, but are not limited to: Asian religious perspectives on climate truths and climate change; Asian religious environmental movements; environmental ethics in Asian religious contexts; Asian religions and the Anthropocene; and  Asian religions, economics, and ecology.

Submissions for the joint session should indicate joint session with Ecology and Asian Religions. Send questions to Jefferson Calico, University of the Cumberlands (Jefferson.calico@ucumberlands.edu)and Mark Wood, Virginia Commonwealth University (mdwood@vcu.edu).

AAR: Religion, Culture, and the Arts

All papers related to Religion, Culture, and the Arts will be considered. Special consideration will be given to papers or panels related to the following themes: (1) Religion and multi-level marketing/pyramid schemes; (2) Religion and the recent explosion of “true crime” media/fandom; (3) Religion and genealogy; (4) Co-sponsored with the Religions in America section, we issue a joint call for papers on Atlanta, Southern Religious Culture, and Arts; (5) Co-sponsored with the Secularism, Religious Freedom, and Global Politics section, we issue a joint call for proposals on secularism, popular culture, and media – this latter panel would focus on topics such as depictions of atheists in media, the relationship between news media and entertainment, debates about secularism in popular culture, and so on. For questions on the joint call, please contact Meredith Ross (mr09@my.fsu.edu) as well as Finbarr Curtis (fcurtis@georgiasouthern.edu) and Charles McCrary (charlesamccrary@gmail.com).

 

AAR: Religion in America

Papers in all areas of Religions in America will be considered, but special consideration will be given to the following themes: (1) Religion, space, place, and the city; (2) Religion and Politics; (3) Papers dealing specifically with the meeting’s 2018 theme “discerning truths” in the context of the Americas; (4) Co-sponsored with the Religion, Culture, and the Arts section, we issue a joint call for papers on Atlanta, Southern Religious Culture, and Arts.

For questions, please contact Andy McKee, am13ag@my.fsu.edu

AAR: Religions of Asia

(1) In conjunction with the 2018 theme, “Discerning Truths,” we solicit proposals on the issue of “revisionist historiographies” in Asian Religions. (2) “Teaching Religions of Asia in the American South: Strategies and Methodological Approaches.” (3) Joint session with Religion and Ecology: We welcome papers addressing Asian religions and the environment crisis. Topics may include, but are not limited to: Asian religious perspectives on climate truths and climate change; Asian religious environmental movements; environmental ethics in Asian religious contexts; Asian religions and the Anthropocene; and Asian religions, economics, and ecology.” (4) Open call.

If you have questions regarding the Religions of Asia section, please contact Rachel Pang, Davidson College (rhpang@davidson.edu) and Jay Valentine, Troy University (jvalentine@troy.edu). Please direct questions regarding Religion and Ecology to Jefferson Calico, University of the Cumberlands (jcalico70@gmail.com) and Mark Wood, Virginia Commonwealth University (mdwood@vcu.edu).

AAR: Secularism, Religious Freedom, and Global Politics

Proposals from any disciplinary or methodological perspective on topics related to secularism, religious freedom, and global politics are welcome. We are especially interested in proposals related to (1) the roles of religious freedom in international relations and foreign policy; (2) critical accounts of “freedom” in the production of “religious freedom;” and (3) comparative studies of secular governance; (4) Co-sponsored with the Religion, Culture, and the Arts section, we issue a joint call for proposals on secularism, popular culture, and media. This latter panel would focus on topics such as depictions of atheists in media, the relationship between news media and entertainment, debates about secularism in popular culture, and so on. For questions on the joint call, please contact Meredith Ross (mr09@my.fsu.edu) as well as this section’s chairs, Finbarr Curtis (fcurtis@georgiasouthern.edu) and Charles McCrary (charlesamccrary@gmail.com).

AAR: Teaching and Learning Religion

The Teaching and Learning Religion section critically examines pedagogical theory and practice. For the 2018 meeting, we are seeking the following: (1) for a joint session with New Testament, proposals that address strategies for introducing undergraduates to the scholarly study of sacred literature; 2) for a joint session with Women, Gender, and Religion, proposals on teaching gender-related concepts in a religion course; and 3) for an open session, proposals dealing with pedagogy, teaching, and the classroom. Questions may be directed to Jodie Lyon (lyon@uga.edu) and Carole Barnsley (cbarnsley@transy.edu).

AAR: Women, Gender, and Religion

The Women, Gender and Religion Section foregrounds issues of women’s studies, gender, and sexuality, whether in critical analysis of and dialogue with religious traditions or texts; in the promotion of the perspectives, insights, and experiences of marginalized persons; or in the ongoing effort to theorize difference so that lives and systems may be changed. Themes: (1) Embodiment; (2) Friendship and (3) a session on issues raised by teaching concepts and theories of gender is a religion course, co-sponsored with Teaching and Learning.

For questions contact Dr. Vicki Phillips, phillips_v@wvwc.edu.

ASOR: Archaeology and the Ancient World

ASOR: Archaeology and the Ancient World invites paper proposals for the following sessions: (1) Open session consisting of reports on ongoing excavations, archaeological theory and/or method, and other topics relating to material culture and archaeology; (2) Joint session with the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament group entitled “Uses and Abuses of Archaeology in the Study of the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament,” which will focus on discussions that are methodological in nature and relevant to a particular interpretive issue (questions to David B. Schreiner, dbschreiner@gmail.com; Clinton Moyer, moyercj@wfu.edu; and Gregory Linton, glinton@johnsonu.edu; (3) Joint session with the Second Temple Judaism section entitled “The Influence of Romanization on Structures, Thought and Practice in Second Temple Judaism” (questions to Michael Fuller, mfuller@leeuniversity.edu; Giancarlo Angulo, gpa15@my.fsu.edu; and Gregory Linton, glinton@johnsonu.edu). Each year, the ASOR section honors the best paper by a graduate student with the Joseph Callaway Award, which includes a monetary gift.

SECSOR: Undergraduate Research

Students at institutions in the Southeast Region are invited to submit papers for the Undergraduate Sessions, sponsored by SECSOR. Open to all topics, the sessions will be composed of the papers considered the best submissions by an interdisciplinary committee. Students should submit completed papers that reflect original student research of an appropriate length for presentation (approximately 12 double-spaced pages). No paper over 15 double-spaced pages, regular size font, will be considered; one submission per student. On a cover page, please include contact information for the student and a faculty sponsor who has reviewed the submission. Proposals are to be submitted through the Google Docs link no later than December 15, 2017. The link is available at the “Proposal Submission Form” tab at the top of the SECSOR home page. Questions may be directed to the program chairs: for AAR, Dr. Joseph Winters (Joseph.Winters@duke.edu); for SBL, Dr. Phillip Michael Sherman, (Phillip.Sherman@maryvillecollege.edu). Note: Undergraduates may submit proposals to other sections as well.

All undergraduate papers are automatically considered for the Undergraduate Paper Prize.

SBL: Hebrew Bible/Old Testament

The Hebrew Bible/Old Testament group invites proposals for two open sessions. All topics will be considered. In addition, the group seeks proposals for a third session, jointly held with the ASOR group, entitled “Uses and Abuses of Archaeology in the Study of the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament.” This session seeks discussions that are methodological in nature and relevant to a particular interpretive issue. Finally, in its fourth session the group will feature a panel discussion of Brent Strawn’s The Old Testament is Dying (Baker, 2017). Panel participants will be invited, but all are encouraged to attend as a Q&A session will consider comments from the floor. Questions may be directed to Drs. David B. Schreiner (dbschreiner@gmail.com) and Clinton J. Moyer (moyercj@wfu.edu)

SBL: New Testament

The New Testament section for the 2018 SECSOR conference invites paper proposals for three sessions: (1) a session for papers dealing with the meeting’s global theme, “Discerning Truths,” (2) an open session for papers in any area of New Testament research, and (3) a joint session between the New Testament and Teaching and Learning Religion sections for papers that address strategies for introducing undergraduates to the scholarly study of sacred texts.  The New Testament section will devote a fourth session to an invited panel discussion of J. R. Daniel Kirk’s recent monograph, A Man Attested by God: The Human Jesus of the Synoptic Gospels (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2016).  For questions regarding the first two sessions, please contact the New Testament Section co-chairs:  Mark Proctor (mproctor@leeuniversity.edu) and Brent Driggers (Brent.Driggers@lr.edu).  For questions regarding the third joint session, please contact either the New Testament section co-chairs or the Teaching and Learning Religion section co-chairs: Jodie Lyon (lyon@uga.edu) and Carole Barnsley (cbarnsley@transy.edu).